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Ultrasound

What is an obstetric ultrasound?

  • Obstetric ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create a picture of your uterus or baby.

Why do I need an ultrasound during my pregnancy?

  • To determine that there is a viable pregnancy developing in the uterus
  • To confirm how far along you are in your pregnancy
  • To monitor the growth of your baby
  • To check the placenta, amniotic fluid level, or cervix
  • To see if the baby has any major problems, please note that only some major structural anomalies can be detected by ultrasound

How is the ultrasound done?

An ultrasound transducer is either placed on your abdomen or inserted into your vagina. Vaginal ultrasound is used if you are in your first trimester of pregnancy. The ultrasound transducer is connected to a computer. As sound waves pass through the body, they are reflected by the body organ and create echoes. The computer converts these echoes into an image of the body organ.

How do I prepare for the ultrasound?

  • Remove any abdominal or genital piercing prior to your appointment.
  • For internal vaginal scans, no preparation is needed.
  • For external abdominal scans, drink until your bladder is mildly full, approximately 16oz.
  • Eat something solid.
  • For the safety of you and your family, please make arrangements for children under the age of 6. If there is an emergency and you are unable to make child care arrangements, the child must be held in the arms of an accompanying adult at all times.
  • No more than 2 people are allowed in the ultrasound room.
  • No videotaping is allowed.

At Commonwealth Ob/Gyn Specialists, we have the very latest in ultrasound technology at each of our office locations. Our ultrasound laboratory is accredited in Obstetrical and Gynecological Ultrasound by the AIUM Ultrasound Practice Accreditation Committee of The American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine.

Our ultrasound staff is experienced, sensitive and highly skilled to make your experience pleasant.


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